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Princeton Bands

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Alumni

  • Oct 22 / 2009
  • 7

Alumni

This page is added because we want to hear from YOU!  As we all know, once a Marching Tiger, ALWAYS a Marching Tiger.  Everyone wants to know what you have done since leaving PCHS.  Take the opportunity to jot down some memories, pass along some ideas, and generally give some “Words of Wisdom” to the current members.  This is such an important thing to the lifetime of the program.

Perhaps you marched and can tell someone about the first time you put on the uniform!  Maybe you met the woman/man of your dreams in band!  Did you forge any life-long friendships?  Is there anything special that you learned and you still carry with you and apply today?  Share these things with others and find out how much comes back to you!  Of course, write whatever you like, but if you prefer, take a look at the topic listed and give us your thoughts!  Leave a comment below, and we will happily post your writings (under “not-so-severe” scrutiny) for others to read and enjoy!

Rev. Jeanne Loveless-Newton – Clarinet Section Leader – Class of ’82
“I remember jumping up & down and screaming until we couldn’t talk as our names were called out for one award after another…”Best Inspection”, “Best Drumline”, “Best Colorguard”.  I remember riding around Princeton in the firetruck my senior year when we came home from all the contests we won.  Music was my LIFE in high school, and Marching Band gave me a sense of discipline, identity, and pride in myself and in us!  I learned how to work hard and work as a team, and I learned to achieve excellence in the things that I do…”

Teres (Kays) Harper – Flute 1981-1985
“I think Band was the one thing that kept me on the straight & narrow.  I know that most people remember the “P” on our star as “Pride”, but I would have to say that the “P” also stood for “Passion”.  Everyone in the Princeton band had that certain Passion for music & adrenaline that was always pumping during a performance.
When I was in band, everyone was Family.  If one was hurting, the others felt their hurt and were there for them.  Band, for me, was a heritage and tradition.  My mom, Madeline (Tressell) Kays, was involved in the band and played flute during the 1940′s.  She would tell me stories about the band back then!
While I was in band, we were so blessed to go to State each year.  Every performance was a roller coaster of emotions and competitions were no different.  I noticed back then that families were alot closer during a competition.  NO ONE missed them, and we heard roars of cheers for us from the stands, from start to finish!
My words of wisdom to those in band or have been in band are to remember all the wonderful memories you had and hold onto them.  They are a part of history in the making!”

Dean Dekemper – 1983 Princeton Drum Major
“P-Star was/is an attitude!  It is knowing what it means and feels like to be part of a group of individuals all striving and achieving the same goal.  Success comes by setting goals and aggressively working to achieve them.  Old P’ton was a machine that entered a stadium with presence. Being drum major at Princeton gave me an insight to that feeling of pride that truly shaped who I am today and why I still am involved in the activity.  People respected the tradition which the organization stood for.  Success is a feeling, not a number that other people wrote on a piece of paper, or trophies that are won.  The performers hold their success on their shoulder… the higher the shoulders, the higher the success.  Take what is valuable and make Princeton a machine once again!”

Tom Meyer – Princeton Class of “86″ – Trombone
“It has been 22 years since I first put on the Star.  It had been a long, hot summer filled with hard work.  The first couple of times I donned the uniform, the Star simply represented the school.
However, after a couple of successful outings, I began to notice something different at the competitions.  First, when we took the field, the entire crowd would hush to watch our performance, including spectators from our rival schools that began to cheer during our shows!!!  The other change, however, had the deeper, more profound effect on me.  I began to notice whenever we would march by other bands, they would stop what they were doing just to watch us pass.
After this realization, the “P” on that star took on a different meaning: Pride.  Pride in myself, Pride in my show, and most importantly, Pride in my band.  After that, the work didn’t seem so hard.  We all had a common goal: and that was to perform the absolute best show we could.
I hope all of you can realize this feeling.  When it is, it will be reflected in your performances.”

Christy Matthews (Stephens) – Princeton Class of “85″ – (Member of the “All-Girl Tuba Line”)
“The “P-Star”… Proud.  People who are passionate about who they are and what they are doing!  A group of young people doing what most don’t understand or even attempt.  That “P” made us fearless.  Every year is a new Princeton band that is obligated (mostly to themselves) to produce the same amount of productivity, perseverance, and persistence that any true Princeton Band would have over the years.  The Battle for Personal Perfection.  It means that the band is doing everything in her power to to accomplish the most important and most difficult effect possible… to know that they have done the very best they can muster, and accomplish something that will shape them for a lifetime.  I LOVE YOU ALL!”

Scott Waldroup – Percussion – Member 1984-1988 – Current Reitz Memorial Instructor
“I started my 8th grade year as an equipment carrier, (a Guard Gopher or “Band-Aid”) if I remember correctly.  That was my first opportunity to step onto the floor of the Hoosier Dome.  AWESOME!!!  That was the only way to describe it.  Band is extremely hard work but the rewards are great.  The friendships, values, work ethic, and overall sense of accomplishment helped me to become the person I am today.  I wouldn’t trade that for anything.”
Member 1984-1988 – Percussion

Tonya Monroe Wells – Princeton Class of “83″- Colorguard
“Marching Band was the best thing that I ever did in High School.  It was really hard work and long hard days, but we all survived.  We were all like one big family and we were there for each other.  I still miss all the competitions and all the fun we had.  Just ask Mr. Hyneman and Miss Milheiser!  We all showed up for all the practices and Band Camp too!  It might have been real hot or really cold, but everyone was there.  So, to make it work, everyone has to pull their share, even when you don’t feel like it.  So work hard and have a little fun while you do it, and be proud to wear that “P” Star!”

Bryce Taylor – Percussion 2000-2004 and current Instructor

“What I remember most about marching band would have to be the people.  The people I marched with are the best friends I could ever ask for, and if it weren’t for marching band, I would never know them like I do.  I know that to this day, I could call anyone that I marched with and ask them for a favor and they would do their best to help me and I would do the same for them.  That’s the type of bond that marching band created for all of us.  I remember the great times when we won and the bad times when we lost, but no matter what happened with the scores, everyone stuck together.  To this day, I’ve never been involved with any activity or organization that has provided me with as much opportunity to personally grow within myself, and I thank all of the staff and the people I marched with for providing me with this opportunity!”

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